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How to Avoid Burying the Lede of Your News Story

Every semester I give students a news writing exercise from my book about a doctor who is giving a speech about fad diets and physical fitness to a group of local businesspeople. Midway through his speech, the good doctor collapses of a heart attack. He dies en route to the hospital. The news of the story may seem obvious, but a few of my students will invariably write a lede that goes something like this: Dr.
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Life

French Expressions: Ça ne fait rien

Expression: Ça ne fait rien Pronunciation: [sah neu fay ryeh(n)] Meaning: it doesn't matter, never mind Literal translation: that does nothing Register: informal​ Notes: The French expression ça ne fait rien is an informal way of dropping a subject or responding to an apology. Ton analyse n'est pas tout à fait correct, mais ça ne fait rien.
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Advices

Interesting Facts About the English Alphabet

"Writers spend years rearranging 26 letters of the alphabet," novelist Richard Price once observed. "It's enough to make you lose your mind day by day." It's also a good enough reason to gather a few facts about one of the most significant inventions in human history. The Origin of the Word Alphabet The English word alphabet comes to us, by way of Latin, from the names of the first two letters of the Greek alphabet, alpha and beta .
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Life

World War II: Battle of Bataan

Battle of Bataan - Conflict & Dates: The Battle of Bataan was fought January 7 to April 9, 1942, during World War II (1939-1945). Forces & Commanders Allies General Douglas MacArthur Lieutenant General Jonathan Wainwright Major General Edward King 79,500 men Japanese Lieutenant General Masaharu Homma 75,000 men Battle of Bataan - Background: Following the attack on Pearl Harbor on December 7, 1941, Japanese aircraft began conducting an aerial assault on American forces in the Philippines.
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Reviews

What is Fuel Atomization?

It takes a lot to make an engine work, but none of it would be possible without the atomization of automotive liquid fuels. In this process, fuel is forced through a small jet opening under extremely high pressure to break it into a fine misted spray. From here, the mist is mixed with air (emulsified) and then vaporized into a rarefied form appropriate for use by an internal combustion engine.
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